Generational Profiling

By January 21, 2010Branding, Marketing

i_want_my_mtvIt sounds so negative, but it could be useful. Ponder your brand for a second. What does it mean to you? What do you think it means to others? Then think about how the four Ps of marketing (product, promotion, price and placement) fit into your audience perception. Did you ever consider that each generation will relate to your brand differently, and thus, your marketing and promotional efforts as well?

Apparently it’s true, but I like to keep an open mind about these things. I can’t help but think sometimes that generation descriptions are more like horiscopes… if you think it’s about you, you can relate. When I read my horoscope, I’m like, “Yes! That’s so true! I totally need to start wearing brighter colors and let loose for a girls night out.” Yeah, me and everyone else. I think generation labels can be the same way. I’m a Gen Y and very much agree with most of what I read and hear, but then I think to myself, if I was a Baby Boomer, could I relate to that too? The answer is yes, I could.

Baby Boomers are loyal and hard workers, Gen Xers want their MTV and Gen Yers are all techie and apparently we’re  all supposed to fall into only one of those categories. So what do you make of generational profiling? Is it legit, or just part of some conspiracy to satisfy our human need to be a part of something meaningful? How do you think your marketing strategies should change with each generation?

Andy Ptacek

Andy Ptacek

Hello, I’m Andy! My part here at Liquis is everything marketing. I get to work in the trenches with the design team on things like brainstorming content and visuals to ensure the marketing and business objectives of our clients are communicated in the most beautiful, strategic fashion. I also work the on the internal marketing initiatives for Liquis, including many cause-related events that coincide with the company’s mission to help.

  • Great conversation starter! I just celebrated my 40th birthday. I’m a gen x’er, I’m totally a product of the 80’s and I love my MTV. (Did I just say totally? That’s so 80’s…)
    I think for certain issues there is a need for generational profiling. Healthcare, for example, is one of those issues. Baby boomers can relate to the affects of aging, medical bills, etc. – and how all of that will affect their pocketbook. AARP continues to be a success in this country because the organization provides a place for this demographic to talk about the issues baby boomers are facing together.
    Alternative transportation, however, is completely different. These days, using mass transit and living carfree is becoming a lifestyle choice rather than something you’re forced to do. The people who read my site range in age from their early 20’s to late 50’s. This means I have to speak to a broad spectrum of people – I find the best way to do that is to just talk about my daily experiences living carfree.